Welcome! All words and images here are for your visual enjoyment, but please, even though it's only for your personal use, ask me first for permission to alter, copy or re-publish any words, images, artwork, photos or web design elements from this blog as they are Andrew Borloz' property, duly protected by international and US copyright laws. Thank you so much for respecting my property ownership.




10 January 2010

Bruce Hebron's The Metal Shed

My friend, Jeri, knows how much I love to see other people's studios and workplaces, so she made an appointment for both of us to visit Bruce's metal studio in central California. After we visited other places in Paso Robles, we headed out into the country. Following the written directions that Jeri had in her hand, we got off the blacktop and onto the dirt road that seemed to lead us to nowhere.

After a while on what it seemed to me an enternal road with no end in sight, I became a little bit uneasy. I wondered if we knew where we were going...

Much to my relief, we saw this sign and right away, I felf safe.

Jeri parked her car near this "Metal Shed", and we were warmly welcomed by the artist/owner, Bruce Hebron. Although it looked like a shack in the picture, it's not.

Before we entered into the metal studio, we were invited to walk around the place and go inside his contemporary style house (not pictured in this blog to respect his privacy). A wheelbarrow below is used as a planter.

That's his garden...

His hand-created gate...

The tool shed...

This is so cool! A boat converted into a planter. I am getting the feeling that Someone's trying to show me how planters can be created in different ways - few days before this one, I saw a sneaker, a car, and a group of flowerpots being used as planters in both northern Oregon and southern Washington.

A colorful fence made with painted shovels - how clever!!!

After we had our drinks and friendly chats in the private home, we head for the studio. I saw this pizza clock, and fell in love with it.

A wallful of templates - Bruce's a modelmaker and he does the castings.

He builds whimsical models that can be used on tracks - they're collectibles. Shown below are two of his many models.

He does the replicas of horses and steam engines, too.

He also does planes and ships - the one below is a scaled replica of a damaged ship.

This is a wall diorama of a fishing village - about 2-3 feet wide. All made entirely of metal.

Another "diorama" of another fishing village - so detailed and colorful.

My favorite one - a hot-dog stand. I don't know why, but I love it!


Jeri and I had a great time - we thoroughly enjoyed Bruce's stories and adventures. I am amazed at the number of rooms and the variety of tools that Bruce used in the creation of his scale models and dioramas. I wish that Bruce has a website that is up and running, but I'm hoping that it will be soon as he has so many amazing models for sale to the collectors and galleries.


----- Home -----